White Lines

Designer Sanjay Garg took this picture of me wearing one his saris when he was in London for their show. It is my absolute favourite sari. It’s made from the lightest, softest cotton so it’s very comfortable and it’s simplicity puts me in a very zen mood! He actually took this picture because of the way the lines matched up at the back purely by chance. Can you see? There’s a line running from top to bottom. I was wasn’t aware when I draped it as it was at the back but when he showed me in the picture I thought it was very special. Whenever I wear this sari I love what the lines do with each different drape or angle. I did a trouser wrap with it and only at the very end of pulling the pallu (long shawl bit) across the middle to tuck it in there a bit of a wow moment as all the fine narrower lines were horizontal so it made a great trim, a bit like a belt. 

I’ve been thinking a lot about drape and little about design but it’s a combination of drape along with the design and weave that combine to create something beautiful. The texture of the fabric also gives you a feel of what might work. I have this black stripe sari trimmed with ahint of wine. It was so heavily starched that it was hard to do anything with it and it felt very bulky. I put it in the wash and it result was surprising. It came out sort of crinkled a bit like cheesecloth which I love for its comfort. I’ve decided not to iron it but it leave it like this. It’s great to wear and has slightly shrunk making it shorter so it suits me better. The lines combined with the drape and the different tones are also wonderful. 

I am encouraged now to move a sari around when deciding how to wear it. Each move shows different angles of the design and varying possibilities if you dare to try. Its amazing how a sari can come to life when you get your head around experimenting with it, making it work you and maybe even being playful. 

 Photo Sanjay Garg

Photo Sanjay Garg

 Soft cotton, soft lines. Raw Mango

Soft cotton, soft lines. Raw Mango